strange hymns: why seeing lana del rey live is a spiritual experience

What does it mean to be a captivating performer in 2017?

Perhaps it has something to do with the stadiums that artists sell out, the pyrotechnics their show uses, or the complex dance routines they train tirelessly to perfect. Or, perhaps it’s something simpler than that. Perhaps, in the case of Lana Del Rey, it’s enough to have a voice that people are beguiled by.

Lana’s had a lengthy, complex relationship with performing live, one that started five years ago with a shaky and now infamous rendition of Blue Jeans on Saturday Night Live (trolls called it “the worst SNL performance ever”). Even now, those who don’t follow her career still define her stage presence by those four minutes of widely disseminated TV.

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how ‘the woman who left’ reshapes movie revenge

If you look at it solely from the perspective of the mention of the ‘revenge thriller’ in its synopsis, you’d think that this four-hour long, black-and-white Filipino film had very little going for it. In reality, it’s a shining example of how the idea of retribution on screen flourishes in the hands of female protagonists.

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how ‘dark night’ refuses to address our sick fascination with mass shootings

Despite the fact that they leave a mark on so many, mass shootings have an air of mystique around them. They create monsters; the kind that are immortalised in TV news broadcasts and Wikipedia pages. Unless we scour for them, we never witness the events that led them to that moment. All that we’re aware of is the brutal hysteria that stems from the act itself.

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from tiff: ‘la la land’ is a shimmering, hollywood homage the world will fall for

There are real life magicians working today who have performed lesser feats than what Damien Chazelle has done with ‘La La Land’. Like, actual magicians. The kinds that pull rabbits from top hats and all that.

Even those who adored the director’s miraculous, perfectly paced debut ‘Whiplash’ were a little apprehensive at the thought of his follow up being a fully fledged musical. An appreciator of fine composition, both musically and in film, Chazelle has stuck to his guns here, presenting us with a rare, lovingly made movie that the messed up modern world has been calling out for.

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from tiff: ‘bleed for this’ is a light impact boxing biopic

Miles Teller is an undeniable talent, albeit one still waiting to match the greatness of the film that made him a star. Back in 2014, Damien Chazelle’s ‘Whiplash’, a ‘Raging Bull’-inspired musical tour de force in which boxing gloves are swapped for drumsticks, won the young actor the respect of both critics and fans alike. For a while, he’s been tied down by young adult fiction franchises and been left bobbing in the shallow end of Marvel’s comic book universe – neither of which making much use of his expertise. Two years later, Teller was still waiting, until his attachment to Ben Younger’s, Scorsese produced boxing flick ‘Bleed for This’ had his supporters chomping at the bit to see him succeed again.

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from tiff: ‘past life’ is a moving morality drama

Past Life, Avi Nesher’s highly anticipated follow up to 2013’s The Wonders, is a moving moral fable about how we face and process the demons that can define our lives.

The year is 1977, and Sephi Milch is a young woman studying vocal performance and composition in a Tel Aviv university. A trip to West Germany leads her to a shaking encounter with a woman who, recognising her last name and language, labels her father a murderer. Unaware of what could have led to this, she alerts her outspoken older sister Nana of what she has heard, and together they band together to visit scenes of his wartime past in an attempt to uncover the truth.

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from tiff: ‘jackie’ is an ornate beauty

In Pablo Larraín’s Jackie, The White House frames Jacqueline Kennedy the way castles frame their queens. The definitive First Lady of the 1960s, who also earned herself the title of a fashion icon, made that place her home; her appreciation of fine decor and relics appearing in almost every room. It makes sense then, that Larraín’s eagerly awaited biopic of the icon feels like the kind of film Kennedy herself would make; astute, swooningly good-looking and blessed with an extraordinary leading lady.

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from tiff: ‘sing’ is a lively, if unsurprising musical

If anybody could add innovation and colour to a film by Illumination Entertainment, chances are that person would be Garth Jennings. The British director, who previously helmed the ‘Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy’ remake and the charming ‘Son of Rambow’, has a tendency to make movies packed with both warmth and wit. We haven’t seen anything new from him since the latter hit our screens back in 2007, but he marks his big screen comeback with ‘Sing’, the latest inevitable box office smash from the studio behind ‘Minions’ and ‘The Secret Life of Pets’.

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from tiff: ‘arrival’ is a nuanced and beguiling sci-fi masterpiece

There’s something sort of ominous about the way the alien spaceships in ‘Arrival’ simply hover over earth in relative silence. Perhaps, after years of directors choosing to depict unknown entities blasting the living daylights out of our landscapes, it’s even more intimidating to see them sit still and do nothing as we wait for their unpredictable reaction. That is, in a way, what makes Denis Villeneuve’s follow-up to the widely acclaimed Sicario so special. We’ve come to expect our science fiction films to have grandiose set pieces and stunning CGI, while Arrival burrows itself under your skin by swapping out violence in favour of conversation.

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from tiff: ‘the secret scripture’ is a drab, disappointing period piece

Rooney Mara is one of those rare actresses who almost never puts a foot wrong. Kicking off her mainstream career as the female muse of David Fincher in both ‘The Social Network’ and ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’, she has delivered a string of exemplary performances that paint her as one of this century’s strongest talents. Perhaps that’s why it’s so sad to see her skills reduced to a sappy, ineffective rubble in ‘The Secret Scripture’, the latest film from ‘My Left Foot’ director Jim Sheridan.

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